Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
Users Online: 209 
Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Wide layoutNarrow layoutFull screen layout
  Home | About JFDS | Editorial Board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Subscribe | Online submission | Contact us | Advertise | Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 135-138

A study on nutritional status and tooth crown size among 6–9-year-old children: An observational cross-sectional study


1 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Navodaya Dental College and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Raichur, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Restorative Dental Science, College of Dentistry, Jazan University, Gizan, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Orthodontics, Navodaya Dental College and Hospital, Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences, Raichur, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Panineeya Dental College and Hospital, NTR University of Health Science, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Correspondence Address:
Mohammed Zameer
Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Navodaya Dental College and Hospital, Raichur - 584 103, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-1475.195122

Rights and Permissions

Background: Numerous factors contribute to variation in tooth size. This is broadly described as genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. A strong genetic contribution has been shown, but environmental factors may also play a role. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional status and tooth crown size. Design: An observational cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 school-going children of 6–9 years. The value obtained was plotted on age- and gender-specific percentile curves chart given by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; individuals were categorized based on body mass index criteria. The participants were examined for the mesiodistal width of primary second molar and permanent first molar by three different observers using a Vernier Caliper. Data obtained were statistically analyzed. Results: total of 45, 40, and 15 belonged to underweight, normal, and overweight category, respectively. The tooth size of primary molar between healthy, overweight, and underweight children was 9.87 ± 0.23, 9.47 ± 0.48, and 9.61 ± 0.7, respectively, and for permanent molar between healthy, overweight, and underweight children was 10.63 ± 0.2, 10.56 ± 0.5, and 10.57 ± 0.6, respectively. Conclusion: The correlation between tooth crown size with an exogenous chronic stressor, i.e., malnutrition, was found to be nonsignificant when compared with the healthy individuals. The findings indicate that nutritional status does not significantly influence the determination of tooth size in humans.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed474    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded52    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal